Non-Licensed Practitioner

Dear Dr. McCollough: Recently I was approached by a friend to attend a “botox party”. There was a man coming to her home to do the injections and my friend was serving cocktails. For some reason, it didn’t sound right, so I opted not to go. Is this type of gathering safe?

Dear Reader: You were wise to be skeptical of such events as not all purveyors of Botox and other injectables are licensed practioners.

When making decisions regarding appearance enhancement, always exercise caution. There are many non-licensed individuals performing services for which they are not accredited to make an extra dollar. This is illegal and is a dangerous practice.

Below are some tips from the American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (AAFPRS) for making an educated choice BEFORE undergoing facial plastic surgery.

And, remember, the term, “plastic” means to change the shape of or to mold.” So, you should consider any procedure that uses needles, lasers etc in order to change one’s appearance as “plastic surgery” no matter how they might label it.

* Understand Board Certifications: Look for a surgeon board certified by the American Board of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery or boards affiliated with the American Board of Medical Specialists (ABMS) that certify doctor for plastic surgery.

* Verify Credentials. It is important to validate the training, skills and experience of the surgeon. The Directory of Medical Specialists, available in public libraries, can be used to check a surgeon’s credentials.2

* Ask for Referrals: When choosing a surgeon, ask friends who have undergone facial plastic surgery, or a trusted family physician for the names of board certified facial plastic surgeons.

In this era of quick fixes and “non-surgical” treatments, the consumer must be careful that the procedure and product being considered is safe, effective, and administered by an experienced professional, specifically licensed to perform the treatment.

If you would like any more information on this or other health related topics, call the McCollough Institute for Appearance and Health at 251-967-7600, email info@mccolloughinstitute.com or visit our website www.mccolloughplasticsurgery.com

If you would like to ask Dr. McCollough a question, email him at drmccollough@mccolloughinstitute.com. All correspondence may be used in future columns; however, names and any personal information will be kept completely confidential.